Small Construction Projects

Small projects

No local stormwater permit required, if:

  • Development or re-development project where land disturbing activities are
    < 5,000 sq ft
  • Activity does not change or disturb existing drainage patterns
  • Special conditions do not exist

Considerations:

  • Must comply with local Construction Ordinance and IDDE Ordinance
  • Inspections may occur
  • Erosion and sediment control practices should be installed if there is a potential for discharge

Some exemptions allowed

  • Exemptions:
    • Gardens – non-commercial
    • Fencing
    • Raised decks, patio covers, awnings
    • Sprinkler system as a stand alone project, small disturbance
    • Minor landscaping – tree & shrub planting, flower beds
    • Residential infrastructure replacement such as waterlines, septic systems, electrical lines, etc.

I have a small project. Do I need permit coverage?

Answer the following questions to determine if you need a local stormwater permit:

1. Is the ground disturbing activity in the project < 5,000 square feet?

2. Does ground disturbing activity change natural drainage patterns?

3. Is project limited to any of the following activities:

  • Garden, noncommercial
  • Fencing
  • Raised deck, patio cover, awning
  • Sprinkler system as a stand alone project, without additional landscaping
  • Minor landscaping such as tree and/or shrub planting, flower beds
  • Replacement of residential infrastructure such as waterlines, septic systems, electrical lines, etc.

If you answered Yes to questions 1 and 3, a local stormwater permit is NOT needed. However, you must comply with the Construction Ordinance.

Answer questions 5 - 9 to evaluate your pollution risk. 

5. Could activity during my project track soil into the street?

6. Could soil from my project wash into the street?

7. Could soil from my project wash onto my neighbor’s property?

8. Will soil or stockpiled soils from my project be exposed for more than 2 weeks?

9. Will equipment and vehicles be washed during project? Will concrete be used on project?

 

Best Management Practices (BMPs) to help reduce your risk.

When designing or developing a small project, take the following practices into consideration to reduce the impact of the project on the stormwater system.

#5 — Does project track soil into the street?

  • Only clear the areas needed, keeping exposed areas to a minimum.
  • Off-site tracking of soil and other pollutants is prohibited. Limit the amount of traffic on the project by establishing one entrance and exit to the project.  Install aggregate rock surfacing at the project entrance to remove excess soil and mud before entering the street.
  • Provide for street cleaning to remove any sediment that may have been tracked out. Sediment should be removed by shoveling or sweeping rather than using water.

#6 & #7—Could soil wash into the street or onto neighbors property?

  • Only clear the areas needed, keeping exposed areas to a minimum.
  • If soil has the chance of leaving your project, install silt fence to trap soil on the project site.
  • Locate excavated soil a reasonable distance behind the curb. This will increase the distance soil must travel to reach the storm system.

#8—Will soil or stockpiled soil be exposed for more than 2 weeks?

  • Piles should be covered until the soil is either used or removed.
  • Piles should be situated so the sediment does not run into the street or adjoining property.
  • Remove excess soil from the site as soon as possible after backfilling.

#9—Will equipment and vehicles be washed during project? Will concrete be used?

  • Set up a wash station on the project site to clean equipment and vehicles. The wash station should be situated so the wash water does not run into the street or onto neighboring property.

 

City of Asotin County of Asotin City of Clarkston